Saturday, August 23, 2014

Zanzibar a small Island in Tanzania, Michanwi Pingwe beach

Beautiful restaurant, beautiful island. It takes just one look understand that no pencil nor brush could draw such beauty – only Mother Nature could have reach such heights. We simply added the love for cooking, courtesy, our professional skills and the joy to share all of this splendour with you.

Zanzibar is the semi-autonomous part of Tanzania in East Africa. It is composed of the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean, 25–50 kilometres (16–31 mi) off the coast of the mainland, and consists of numerous small islands and two large ones: Unguja (the main island, referred to informally as Zanzibar) and Pemba. The capital is Zanzibar City, located on the island of Unguja. Its historic centre is Stone Town, which is a World Heritage Site.

Zanzibar's main industries are spices, raffia, and tourism. In particular, the islands produce cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and black pepper. For this reason, the islands, together with Tanzania's Mafia Island, are sometimes called the Spice Islands (a term also associated with the Maluku Islands in Indonesia). Zanzibar is the home of the endemic Zanzibar Red Colobus Monkey, the Zanzibar Servaline Genet, and the (possibly extinct) Zanzibar Leopard.

People have lived in Zanzibar for 20,000 years. History proper starts when the islands became a base for traders voyaging between the African Great Lakes, the Arabian peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent. Unguja offered a protected and defensible harbor, so although the archipelago had few products of value, Omanis and Yemenis settled in what became Zanzibar City (Stone Town) as a convenient point from which to trade with towns on the Swahili Coast. They established garrisons on the islands and built the first mosques in the African Great Lakes.

During the Age of Exploration, the Portuguese Empire was the first European power to gain control of Zanzibar, and kept it for nearly 200 years. In 1698, Zanzibar fell under the control of the Sultanate of Oman, which developed an economy of trade and cash crops, with a ruling Arab elite and a Bantu general population. Plantations were developed to grow spices; hence, the moniker of the Spice Islands (a name also used of Dutch colony the Moluccas, now part of Indonesia).

Another major trade good was ivory, the tusks of elephants that were killed on the Tanganyika mainland. The third pillar of the economy was slaves, which gave Zanzibar an important place in the Arab slave trade, the Indian Ocean equivalent of the better-known Triangular Trade. The Omani Sultan of Zanzibar controlled a substantial portion of the African Great Lakes coast, known as Zanj, as well as extensive inland trading routes.

Perched on a rock in the middle of the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Zanzibar, Tanzania, is a tiny seafood restaurant simply named The Rock Restaurant.

The one and only Rock Restaurant rises on a rock not distant from the shore of the beautiful Michanwi Pingwe beach. Eating at Rock Restaurant is an experience you can’t miss: colours, relish and sensations blend together in unique magic.

Depending on the tides that day, you can go walking, swimming or even by boat. The restaurant serves a wide variety of sea food with a distinctly Zanzibari twist as well as a a selection of wines, beers and soft drinks.

At the suitably-named Rock Restaurant, diners are provided with more than just fresh fish caught from the Indian Ocean. Selections include delicacies like Fish Carpaccio, Calamari prepared with prawns and zucchini, or familiar treats like Lobster Spaghetti and more. The seafood is always fresh there.

Breathtaking views and fresh sea air also greet visitors who come to this restaurant, in Zanzibar, East Africa. The Rock, which opened last year, can be reached on foot, but at high tide diners need to be transported back to the mainland by boat.